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Tag: Reverb10

Don’t talk with your mouth full (makes it hard for me to eavesdrop)

‘Twas a long day, with a long drive to and fro. (In the post that got eaten yesterday, I explained that I was accompanying my boyfriend on a work trip up to Lake Texoma today.) As always, I kept my camera on my lap in case I saw anything interesting along the way, and, as always, I missed a few, such as the sign on a semi which read, “Caution: I make wide ass turns,” a church named, “Truth,” a Hulk Hogan doppelganger, and a business called, “The Shop,” which had the slogan, “What happens at The Shop stays at…

Silent Sunday (sort of)

Looks like my blog ate yesterday’s post! All that’s left is this photo, but no text, and it wound up in my drafts folder instead of posting to my site. Come to think of it, this has happened a couple times before in years past. In future, I will double check after hitting publish to make sure that it actually did. Irritating! In lieu of reconstructing yesterday’s post, which was written on the fly, I will simply end with the caption I have accompanying this photo on my Facebook page: If this building were a cookie, I could just imagine…

Motor Trend Sets Rush Limbaugh Straight

Rush Limbaugh recently denounced Motor Trend for picking the Chevrolet Volt as its 2011 Car of the Year. I don’t follow Limbaugh’s show, because it hurts my vision to roll my eyes that much in one sitting. Still, when I heard he was against the Volt, it really irked me. For one thing, Rush got his facts all wrong. He made a big deal about how none of the cars have sold, for example. Well, buddy, that’s because none are for sale, yet! (See what I mean about the eye rolling?) Today, however, I read Motor Trend‘s open letter to…

Zeitgeist, Reverb 10, and why English is like a snowball

I was gonna keep on trucking, but having no trucking license, I have decided to keep on blogging, instead. I signed up for NaBloPoMo again mainly because this December’s theme is zeitgeist. I adore that word. It has German roots, zeit means time and geist means ghost – as in poltergeist, y’know, which is literally a noisy ghost. I visited Germany once and realized that if a word wasn’t in my dictionary, I could often figure it out if I broke the word in pieces and looked up each chunk separately. The German language is modular, like Legos. English reminds…