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Tag: historical

#IndieBookmas A Holiday Gift Guide Featuring Books by Indie Authors

Need Gift Ideas for Book Lovers? Scroll down! #IndieBookmas is a Holiday Gift Guide for Readers Books make great gifts! Here’s a list of Indie Authors you can support by buying their books this holiday season! To help you, each author describes the type of reader who will like their books. What kind of readers are on your list? Need a gift for Aunt Sally, the genealogy buff? How about your little brother who loves scary movies? Scroll down the list to find the perfect books to give to the people on your Christmas list this year. (And if you’re…

Famous Texas Tree: The Turner Oak in Fort Worth

Gold Buried Beneath a Fort Worth Tree Seceding from the United States was not an easy decision for the State of Texas, and many Texans, including Charles Turner (1822-1873) a farmer, merchant and Texas Ranger, were against it. Even so, once the state voted to withdraw from the Union, Mr. Turner reluctantly went along with it – up to a point. While Charles Turner showed his support of secession by funding a company of volunteer soldiers with his own money, he balked at the idea of exchanging his hard-earned fortune for Confederate notes, which is why he ended up burying…

A to Z Texas: S is for Santa Claus Gets Lynched

Bad Santa Sparks Massive Manhunt in Texas One of the biggest manhunts in Texas state history was for none other than Santa Claus. But before I go further, let me set the scene: Dead Bank Robber Reward Program While “Wanted: Dead or Alive,” is the phrase commonly associated with bounty posters, back in 1927, the Texas Bankers Association (TBA) did away with the, “or alive,” clause and began offering a reward of $5000 for each dead bank robber that citizens or law enforcement could produce. Called the Dead Bank Robber Reward Program,┬áthis bounty was in response to a massive crime…

A to Z Texas: R is for Ren Fair in Waxahachie

Scarborough Fair in Waxahachie, Texas Every spring, Waxahachie, Texas hosts a huge ren fair, officially called the Scarborough Renaissance Festival. Back in 2010, it was the first such medieval reenactment I’d ever been to and – wow – was it ever fun. I had so much fun, in fact, that I returned in 2011 to get married! Not only were we married by the Archbishop of Canterbury, but we literally tied the knot. While renaissance fairs are not unique to Texas, the one over in Waxahachie is a big one: over 35 acres of shops and buildings that remain intact…