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#Review Log Cabin Guest Haus in Cisco, Texas

Weekend getaway in West Texas

Last weekend, my husband, father-in-law, and I had a weekend getaway at the Log Cabin Guest Haus in Cisco, Texas. [Please note: While our lodging was provided free of charge and this post may contain affiliate links, the opinions expressed here are wholly my own.]

Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)
Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)

Historic cabin purchased on eBay!

This historic log cabin dates back to the 1840’s but it was not built here in Texas. BnB hosts, John and Mary Kay Williamson, purchased the building on eBay, yes, eBay! I had no idea you could buy a house on that site, but there you go. The cabin was disassembled and shipped all the way from Pennsylvania! Once it arrived in Cisco, John spent a few years reassembling it to create a rustic-yet-modern bed and breakfast inn.

I met John a couple years ago while researching my book, The Lynching of the Santa Claus Bank Robber. I arrived in Cisco with a list of museums, graveyards and people to interview, but every person I spoke to added something more to my list. It was so much fun! Dropping by the log cabin one of these impromptu additions. Although John Williamson was clearly in the middle of a hard day’s work, he took the time to give us a tour of the house and explain his plans. I was immediately impressed and have wanted to stay there ever since!

Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)
Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)

 

Logs from an extinct American tree

Any do-it-yourself types who book a room at the Log Cabin Guest Haus will enjoy leafing through the hefty photo album showcasing the Williamson’s progress as they reconstructed the building in West Texas.

One surprising and unique feature to this historic log cabin is that its rugged wooden beams are made from American chestnut. While American chestnut was plentiful in the 1840’s, a blight struck in 1904 and quickly wiped the trees out! (Excellent article about that here: American Chestnut History) Very few chestnut trees remain in America.

Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)
Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)

Modern comforts combine with rustic charm

The couple did a wonderful job of combining the rustic charm of the historic cabin with the cozy comforts of the 21st century. Sure, it’s a historic log cabin, but we had indoor plumbing, hot and cold running water, screaming fast WIFI, hot showers, great water pressure, a Keurig coffee maker, and heaters to keep us warm and dry during the rainy weekend. Plus, my father-in-law, Bob, can’t fall asleep unless the TV is on, so we were able to pop a DVD on for him each night.

And despite all the aforementioned modern conveniences, it was easy to pretend my husband and I were frontier settlers as we cozied up beneath the antique quilts and listened to rain on the tin roof. Hey, I didn’t read all those Little House on the Prairie books as a kid for nothing!

Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)
Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)

Great space for families

Cisco’s Log Cabin Guest Haus sleeps six people. In our case, Bob slept on the fold out couch downstairs. His bed was big and comfortable. My husband, Larry, and I slept in the upstairs loft, which includes another bed and has its own toilet and shower. I love that loft! Thanks to the open floor plan, we learned that Bob talks in his sleep – a LOT! So, keep that in mind with your guests.

In fact, I’d say that the Log Cabin Guest Haus is best for family and close friends. If you feel comfortable enough with the folks you’re staying with to holler out “good night, John boy” from your bed before falling asleep, then go for it. If not, maybe you should simply book it for you and your partner. Either way, it is definitely worth the stay!

Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)
Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)

Tasteful decor, like something out of a magazine

The Williamson’s are expert decorators, as well as renovators. In fact, in addition to running a bed and breakfast, theWilliamson’s own an antique shop in downtown Cisco called Log Cabin Antiques. (Are you sensing a theme?) Some of my favorite touches were the stencils on the staircase, the handmade wooden door latches, and the pattern Mary Kay painted on the wood floor in the upstairs loft. We stayed in December, so the cabin featured tasteful Christmas decorations throughout.

By the way, if you like the cute little old-fashioned nightie I’m wearing in the photo, you can buy one for yourself by following this link: lace & ruffle trim nightgown. I’ve been really happy with it. It washes and wears well and it’s modest enough to wear to breakfast in the morning.

Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)
Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)

Sleep late or get up early, breakfast time is flexible

Each morning, John Williamson would deliver a wonderful breakfast cooked by his wife, Mary Kay, to our back door. The menu and delivery time were easily worked out via text message the night before.

The first morning, Mary Kay sent over a hearty egg casserole in individual ramekins, along with toast, a fruit cup and orange juice. The fridge was stocked with an array of tasty jams and preserves. I really enjoyed the peach butter – yum!

Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)
Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)

Oh, those cinnamon chip scones!

The second morning we opted for decadent cinnamon chip scones, sausages, and orange juice. Mary Kay sent 6 scones over, but we only ate 3 that morning. We saved the rest for a treat the next day, and they were a tasty reminder of our delightful West Texas getaway. I really like how the Williamson’s allow their guests to set the breakfast time of their choice. Early risers will be just as happy as those who want to sleep in and take their time enjoying the log cabin.

For our other meals, we dined at Waverly’s coffee shop and Shannon’s Burger Barn. (I will add links to my reviews of both of these eateries here soon!) For a little West Texas town, Cisco has some surprisingly tasty family-owned restaurants. We really enjoyed them both.

Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)
Log Cabin Guest Haus bnb in Cisco, Texas (photo by Tui Snider)

More info & how to book your stay at the Log Cabin Guest Haus

If you’re looking for a romantic getaway or just a break from your hectic routine, I highly recommend booking a room at the Log Cabin Guest Haus and exploring all that the friendly little West Texas town of Cisco has to offer! The three of us had a wonderful time and plan to return the first chance we get.

For more information & to book your stay: click here to visit the Log Cabin Guest Haus official website. And, remember, when you book your room, tell them Tui sent you! :)

FREE Cemetery Symbols Guide:

Would you like a FREE guide to historic cemetery symbolism? If so, click the image below:

Tui Snider
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Tui Snider

Tui Snider is an author, speaker, and photographer who specializes in quirky, haunted, and downright bizarre destinations. As she puts it, “I used to write fiction – but then, I moved to Texas!” Snider's writing and photography have been featured in a variety of publications, including Coast to Coast AM, FOX Travel News, LifeHack, Langdon Review, the City of Plano, Wild Woman Waking, Shades of Angels and more. Snider’s award-winning books include Paranormal Texas, The Lynching of the Santa Claus Bank Robber, and Unexpected Texas. Snider has several more books in progress, including a Field Guide to Cemetery Symbols and a book about the Great Texas Airship Mystery of 1897. Tui has worn a lot of hats in her life – literally – and is especially fond of berets. She enjoys connecting with writers and readers all over the globe through social media, her newsletter and her website: TuiSnider.com.
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